Catholic Parish of Warkworth and Puhoi


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The World Community
for Christian Meditation

The World Community for Christian Meditation
is an international organisation of meditators
whose practice of this universal tradition is
rooted in theteachings of the Gospels and
the early Christian monastic methods of
prayer and contemplation.
Forgotten over the centuries, this aspect of
Christian spirituality in the life of the Church
was rediscovered and revived by
Fr. John Main, OSB (1926-1982),
a Benedictine monk
who in the 1970s reintroduced it
into the lives of religious
and lay people alike. Here in New Zealand
there are meditation groups in many cities
and towns meeting regularly in churches,
community halls and private homes.
To find out more visit
www.christianmeditationnz.org.nz




Acts of the Apostles 4:8.12; Psalm 117; St John 3:1-2; John 10:11-18
Acts of the Apostles 4:8.12; Psalm 117; St John 3:1-2; John 10:11-18


22nd April 2018 - 4th Sunday of Easter



This Sunday's Readings;

FIRST READING: Acts of the Apostles 4:8.12

image This is the only one by which we can be saved.

Filled with the Holy Spirit, Peter said: ‘Rulers of the people, and elders! If you are questioning us today about an act of kindness to a cripple, and asking us how he was healed, then I am glad to tell you all, and would indeed be glad to tell the whole people of Israel, that it was by the name of Jesus Christ the Nazarene, the one you crucified, whom God raised from the dead, by this name and by no other that this man is able to stand up perfectly healthy, here in your presence today. This is the stone rejected by you the builders, but which has proved to be the keystone. For of all the names in the world given to men, this is the only one by which we can be saved.’

The Word of the Lord.


Psalm 117

Response: The stone which the builders rejected has become the corner stone.
or - Alleluia!

1. Give thanks to the Lord for he is good,
for his love has no end.
It is better to take refuge in the Lord
than to trust in men:
it is better to take refuge in the Lord
than to trust in princes. - Response

2. I will thank you for you have given answer
and you are my saviour.
The stone which the builders rejected
has become the corner stone.
This is the work of the Lord,
a marvel in our eyes. - Response

3. Blessed in the name of the Lord
is he who comes.
We bless you from the house of the Lord;
I will thank you for you have given answer
and you are my saviour.
Give thanks to the Lord for he is good;
for his love has no end. - Response


SECOND READING: St John 3:1-2

We shall see God as he really is.

Think of the love that the Father has lavished on us, by letting us be called God’s children; and that is what we are.
Because the world refused to acknowledge him, therefore it does not acknowledge us.
My dear people, we are already the children of God but what we are to be in the future has not yet been revealed;
all we know is, that when it is revealed we shall be like him because we shall see him as he really is.

The Word of the Lord.


GOSPEL ACCLAMATION : Jn 10: 14

Alleluia, alleluia!
I am the good shepherd;
I know my own and my own know me
Alleluia!


GOSPEL : John 10:11-18

The good shepherd is one who lays down his life for his sheep.

Jesus said:

‘I am the good shepherd:
the good shepherd is one who lays down his life for his sheep.
The hired man, since he is not the shepherd and the sheep do not belong to him,
abandons the sheep and runs away as soon as he sees a wolf coming, and then the wolf attacks and scatters the sheep;
this is because he is only a hired man and has no concern for the sheep.
I am the good shepherd; I know my own and my own know me, just as the Father knows me and I know the Father; and I lay down my life for my sheep.
And there are other sheep I have that are not of this fold, and these I have to lead as well.
They too will listen to my voice, and there will be only one flock, and one shepherd.
The Father loves me, because I lay down my life in order to take it up again.
No one takes it from me; I lay it down of my own free will, and as it is in my power to lay it down,
so it is in my power to take it up again; and this is the command I have been given by my Father.’

The Gospel of the Lord.










Readings from The Jerusalem Bible © 1966 by Darton Longman & Todd Ltd and Doubleday and Company Ltd.
Psalm © The Grail (England) published by HarperCollins.




Understanding the Liturgical Cycle

The Lectionary is arranged into two cycles, one for Sundays and one for weekdays. The Sunday cycle is divided into three years, labeled A, B, and C. 2005 was Year A, 2006 was Year B, 2007 was Year C, and so on. The Liturgical Year begins on the 1st Sunday of Advent (usually late November) and ends with the Feast of Christ the King.

In Year A, we read mostly from the gospel of Matthew. In Year B, we read the gospel of Mark and chapter 6 of the gospel of John. In Year C, we read the gospel of Luke. The gospel of John is read during the Easter season in all three years.

The first reading, usually from the Old Testament, reflects important themes from the gospel reading. The second reading is usually from one of the epistles, a letter written to an early church community. These letters are read semi-continuously. Each Sunday, we pick up close to where we left off the Sunday before, though some passages are never read.

The weekday cycle is divided into two years, Year I and Year II. Year I is read in odd-numbered years (2003, 2005, etc.) and Year II is used in even-numbered years (2002, 2004, etc.) The gospels for both years are the same. During the year, the gospels are read semi-continuously, beginning with Mark, then moving on to Matthew and Luke. The gospel of John is read during the Easter season. For Advent , Christmas, and Lent , readings are chosen that are appropriate to the season. The first reading on weekdays may be taken from the Old or the New Testament. Typically, a single book is read semi-continuously (i.e. some passages are not read) until it is finished and then a new book is started.

This year (2018) is Year B/II




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